Reviews

Not Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee

Ruth West - Thursday, September 07, 2017

Title: Not Your Sidekick
Author: C.B. Lee
Publisher: Duet, Interlude Press
Published: Sept. 8, 2016
Genre: LGBT, YA, Superhero




A diverse story that suffers from stylistic issues in the writing. Littered throughout the book are awkward sentences, not fragments or incorrect punctuation but sentences that just feel awkward. The story, although predictable suffers mostly from not having a decent round of strong edits to fix the phrases that don't feel natural. How best do I explain this? I feel like the book is being told to me, read by a voice that isn't my own. In most instances of reading you imagine the characters. Personally had the book been written in past tense the writing may have smoothed out some of the inconsistencies and awkwardness. I do recognize that many YA books are moving toward the trend of present tense, but this book clearly suffers because of it. Perhaps if it has been written in first person and the many instances of show don't tell removed, it would have been a better, stronger book. Third person present tense just doesn't work for this story. 

Here's an example that tripped me up while reading. I just felt like I was being tossed out of the book:

They gossip about Captain Orion's romantic life and then get into a silly discussion about the most attractive heroes in the League. The movie is playing but they aren't paying much attention. Jess lost track of the plot a few minutes in. She's enjoying her time with her friends as they argue about who is hotter: Starscream or Copycat.

I wanted to love this story, everything about the plot seemed great but the struggle of reading the style was too much for me. I recommend reading a sample before buying.

Reviewed by: Laura


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Same Love by Tony Correia

Ruth West - Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Title: Same Love
Author: Tony Correia
Publisher: James Lorimer & Company
Releases: August 1, 2017
Genre: LGBT, Romance, YA



An easy read that is quite often lined with humor despite the heavy subject nature of Same Love. This book is quite clearly written for young adults but I would recommend this story only to those mature enough to handle the content. Where some books drag on to get to the point of the story, I appreciated that Same Love jumped right in with the first chapter. There was easily enough backstory to get onboard and relate while also feeling for the characters, especially Adam. The writing is smooth and clean, the characters have depth and are well-rounded. Although there are obscenities thrown early on in the story (strong enough to cast a long-lasting impression), while also making the reader flinch, this book isn't for the faint of heart or those too young to grasp the message. Adam, a Christian teenage boy that comes out to his parents finds himself sent away to a Christian camp to "fix" him. The sad reality is how true and easily this book could be real for someone that is a teenager, struggling with coming out.
Reviewed by: Laura

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The Gravity Between Us by Kristen Zimmer

Ruth West - Thursday, July 06, 2017

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